DevDisasters


Lost in Translation

After Wayne's employer decided to bring some outsourced code back in house, he discovered that developers in Kerbleckistan were doing some serious innovating in the science of passing parameters.

The $100,000 Deadline

A critical auditing app was as down as the floor of the Grand Canyon. And each day it was down was a six-figure fine.

Adventures in Nepotism

What's proper etiquette for handling code snafus when working for -- literally -- a mom-and-pop company?

The End of Days

It's a situation a coder should never have to face: perpetuating bad coding practices from years ago, or just fixing the darn thing!

Unlucky 13?

Would going above and beyond when fixing terrible code have serious consequences?

Out To Lunch

Why user requests shouldn't always be granted.

A Matter of Fax

That dinosaur of an office appliance -- the fax machine -- plays an unexpected role in Jason's Web site registration puzzle.

The T-SQL Trick

When fewer SQL Server columns does not mean better performance.

Reverse Psychology

Everything at Henry's company revolved around contracts with vendors. The IT department had relied on the aptly named Contract Manager -- the sole remaining Visual Basic 6 client-server application -- to support that business for the past 12 years.

An Epic FAIL for this Web Service

The office where Peter L. works was abuzz with excitement one morning a few months ago when the familiar, bland corporate art was missing from the wall opposite the elevators.

Arrested Development: VB6 Now and Forever

When Brett was hired on as a senior analyst, he wasn't surprised to learn that the older platforms were built around Visual Basic 6 (VB6), which was no longer supported by Microsoft.

Dev Disasters: Too Many Cooks

Dueling developers create an unappetizing code stew.

Dev Disasters: Rounding Errors

Usually, when a multi-megabyte e-mail lands in Jerry's inbox, it means that someone tried to be fancy by including some silly photos or graphic images in intra-office correspondence.

Dev Disasters: Just Following Orders

A major validation error in the code resulted in a 60 percent failure rate for an expense form.

The Spaghetti Code Incident

Henry was the TAXCALC king. But his coding skills were positively peasant-like.

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