Practical .NET


No Comment: Why Commenting Code Is Still a Bad Idea

Peter Vogel responds to the furor about his contention that developers do too much code commenting. He says that documenting code, while it may be necessary, isn't valuable.

Architecting Code in the Presentation Layer

Building your applications so that each part does just one job well makes everything easier. Peter Vogel applies that approach to a Windows Forms app and, in addition to getting it to work, creates a more responsive application.

What's New in TypeScript 0.9

The latest version of TypeScript adds generics but there's more in the package than that. Peter looks at what's new.

Why You Shouldn't Comment (or Document) Code

It isn't news that developers don't like documenting their code. But you have good reason not to. And if you are documenting code, try to stop! It's not too late.

Handle Many-to-Many Relationships in Entity Framework and ASP.NET MVC

In this month's column, Peter Vogel takes a single -- and common -- problem and looks at all the technologies you can use to solve it, from getting the data design correct through handling updates and finishing with a UI built in ASP.NET MVC.

Create a Flexible Security System for the ASP.NET Platform in the .NET Framework 4.5

Sometimes you need more than roles to effectively manage authorizing user requests. You can do that without moving to claims-based security in the Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5 by creating your own user object.

Finding the Problems in Your UI and Listening to Users Effectively

While there are several tools available to monitor your application's performance, when it comes to improving your UI, it's your understanding of your users that's critical to finding problems.

Use Predicate Methods to Stop Writing For...Each Loops

Predicate methods allow you to separate the criteria you're using to test items in a collection from the code that processes the collection. You may never write a For...Each loop again.

Creating Sortable Objects with IComparable and Planning Your Interface Strategy

The IComparable interface lets you create objects that know how to sort themselves correctly. This interface also provides an example of a high-level strategy for building and extending your classes.

To Build a Great UI, Test the Experience, Not the Code

Your UI could work exactly the way you intended it to work and still fail during usability testing.

Understanding .NET Using Read-Only Collections

Even if you're not working in the Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5, .NET provides you with a way to create a read-only collection or to convert an existing List into a read-only collection.

Unity vs. MEF: Picking the Right Dependency Injection Manager

Peter Vogel compares both of the Microsoft dependency injection managers/inversion of control containers and comes up with a decision tree for picking the correct one.

Shorten Your Backlog: Integrating ASP.NET and SharePoint

Integrating your .NET line-of-business applications with SharePoint is easy to do and allows you to transfer a ton of work from your desk to your users' desks.

Redefining Mobile UIs with ASP.NET

Because the mobile platform has come later in the history of computing, developers have gotten in the habit of redesigning desktop applications for the handheld device. Peter Vogel thinks developers have that backward, and that the UI design process shows the way out.

Configuring WCF Routing Without Code

Peter Vogel returns to creating a Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) router that loosely couple services with their clients. But this time he uses XML to configure his router rather than doing it in code.

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