Practical .NET


Adding Business Services in WPF with Prism and Unity

WPF with Prism and Unity allow you to create loosely-coupled applications that assemble themselves at run time. Here's how Prism and Unity allow you to dynamically integrate business logic into your application.

Creating Modularity with WPF, Prism and Unity

If you're building Windows Presentation Foundation applications that will change over time or have some combination of complex workflows, rich user interaction, and significant presentation or business logic, Microsoft recommends that you add Prism and Unity to your toolkit. That's good advice.

Building a Simpler WebSockets Service

Peter pays a final visit to the WCF 4.5 WebSockets implementation to take advantage of the WebSocketService class and build a service in six lines of code (not counting configuration and client-side code, of course).

Building a JavaScript WebSockets Client

Create a JavaScript client that works with a WCF 4.5 WebSockets service to receive continuous, ongoing updates from the service.

Powerful JavaScript With Upshot and Knockout

The Microsoft JavaScript Upshot library provides a simplified API for retrieving data from the server and caching it at the client for reuse. Coupled with Knockout, the two JavaScript libraries form the pillars of the Microsoft client-side programming model.

Writing a WCF 4.5 WebSocket Service

Peter Vogel continues his exploration of WCF 4.5's support for WebSockets by writing the code to accept data from the client and then return data to the client whenever that data becomes available.

Implementing WebSockets in WCF 4.5

Peter introduces WCF 4.5's support for WebSockets first by describing why you care and then by setting up to build a bi-directional service using Windows Server 8, and Visual Studio 11.

Changes Large and Small: WCF 4.5 and the ASP.NET Web API

While Windows Communication Foundation 4.5 has lots of little improvements, the ASP.NET Web API is a very big change. You'll probably end up taking advantage of both, so here's what's in the pipeline for you.

Test Driving a JavaScript MVC Framework

Peter looks at Knockout, one of the MVC environments for writing client-side JavaScript, and wonders if we're on the wrong path.

Adding Client-Side Validation in ASP.NET MVC 3

By having your Data Annotations implement the IClientValidatable interface, you can make it easy for developers to integrate your client-side validation into your Views.

Integrating Validation with the Entity Framework

Validation should begin as close to your database as possible: in your Entity Framework entities. Here's how you can integrate validation code into both the entities the Entity Framework generates and the ones you write.

Separating Validation Code from Business Objects Using DataAnnotations

While you can create classes that contain their own validation code, there are scenarios where it makes sense to separate validation code from the properties it validates using DataAnnotations.

Incremental Validation in WPF

WPF provides the richest environment for developers to incorporate standalone validation classes into their user interfaces—and for business object developers to support an application's user interface.

Exploiting the .NET Validation Frameworks

Implementing one of three interfaces can turn your business classes into self-validating components that seamlessly integrate into WPF, Silverlight and ASP.NET MVC applications -- and can be easily extended to other environments.

Construct XAML Forms at Runtime with Resource Files

WPF makes it very easy to load non-executable resources at run time -- including a complete UI in XAML. Here's how to leverage that functionality to create applications that you can customize without recompiling.

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