Practical .NET


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Letting the Client Control Data Retrieval with GraphQL in .ASP.NET Core

GraphQL lets you create data access services without writing controllers. Instead of writing procedural code, you declare schemas describing what queries you'll accept and what you're willing to return. Here's how to get started in ASP.NET Core.

Suppressing Events in Blazor and ASP.NET Core Version 3.1

ASP.NET Core Version 3.1 adds some new features for managing events in Blazor. You may think you'll never need them, but there may be a time when you'll be glad to know about at least one of them.

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Sharing Data and Splitting Components in Blazor

ASP.NET Core Version 3.1 has at least two major changes that you'll want to take advantage of. Well, Peter thinks you will. Depending on your background, your response to one of them may be a resounding “meh.”

Don't Do It All Yourself: Exploiting gRPC Well Known Types in .NET Core

If you're creating business services that send dates and decimal data then you may be concerned that gRPC services don't support the relevant data types. Don't Panic! There are solutions. Here's how to use them.

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Implementing State in .NET Core gRPC Messages with oneof

In the real world, you've been dealing with the State pattern every time you designed a set of database tables. The Protocol Buffers specification lets you do the same thing when you define the messages you send and receive from your gRPC Web Service.

Reusing and Recycling Data Structures in gRPC Services in .NET Core

Here's everything you need to know to create a standard set of reusable message formats to use with your gRPC services.

.NET Core: Writing Really Obvious Code with Enumerated Values in gRPC Web Services

Peter's pretty fanatical about replacing documentation/comments with readable code. So he's very excited about using enums when defining gRPC services. Very. Excited. But there are some best practices and "things to be aware of" when using this feature.

How to Design Messages for gRPC Services in .NET Core

Defining your gRPC service using the Protocol Buffers specification is pretty easy. There are just a couple of things to be aware of as you convert from the specification to .NET Core and then manage your service's evolution.

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Working with Claims to Authorize Users in ASP.NET Core and Blazor

When you need to integrate authorizing the user to perform some activity (or just want to retrieve information about the current user), you need to work with the ClaimsPrincipal’s Claims objects. Here’s everything you might want to do.

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Accessing and Extending Authorization Claims in ASP.NET Core and Blazor

When you need to integrate authorization with procedural code, you're going to need your application's ClaimsPrincipal object so that you can check the user's authorization claims. Here's both how to get to the ClaimsPrincipal and how to extend it with custom claims.

Declarative Claims-Based Authentication in ASP.NET Core 3.0

While security in ASP.NET Core is wholly claims based, you can still use the Authorize attribute to control access to your application. You just need to set up the right policies to work with the claims associated with the current user.

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How to Authorize Users in Blazor Declaratively

When it comes to controlling which users can access which functionality in a Blazor application you not only have access to all of the user’s authentication you can authorize the user’s actions without writing any code.

Writing the Code for a gRPC Service and Client in ASP.NET Core 3.0

Once you've got a contract that describes a gRPC service, creating the service itself and a client that can call the service is easy. In fact, Visual Studio will do most of the work for you ... once you've got your projects set up correctly, that is.

Defining Your First gRPC Service in an ASP.NET Core 3.0 Project

gRPC services promise a lot: better performance, more sophisticated messaging, and a contract-based approach to Web Service development. If those sound good to you, here's how to get started.

Decrypting (But Not Really Encrypting) Configuration Settings in ASP.NET Core

You can store encrypted values in your ASP.NET Core configuration file and seamlessly decrypt the values as you retrieve them. But there are, at least, two issues that you'll need to address.

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