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Microsoft Exec: 100,000 Windows Store Apps by January

You'd better get to work. Microsoft is counting on you, dear developer, to write Windows 8 apps at a furious pace.

At least, that seems to be Microsoft's stance, based on an interview with Keith Lorizio, Microsoft's vice president of U.S. sales and marketing, that appeared on Beet.tv. In the interview, currently making the rounds of cyberspace, Lorizio says Microsoft's goal is to have "100,000-plus" apps in the Windows Store within 90 days of Windows 8's release, which would put it at Jan. 26.

That's quite a high bar to hit, considering that there are currently fewer than 4,000 apps in the store. That's according to data from a new site, WinAppUpdate.com, started last month by Wes Miller, a Research Vice-President at Directions on Microsoft. Miller also spent time in the Windows division at Microsoft.

Lorizio's counting on huge Windows 8 adoption for the carrot -- if Microsoft builds it, they will come. "It's critical for us to get a critical mass of apps", he says.

The available marketplace for Windows 8, says Lorizio, is one billion-plus consumers. "In order for us to reach our goals, which is a conservative estimate of 400 million units in marketplace by July 1, we know we have to have a very, very healthy ecosystem of apps," Lorizio says.

No kidding. Microsoft continues to face a chicken-and-egg situation: Applications draw customers to a platform, but developers are drawn to platforms with the most customers. But if Microsoft can reach that "conservative" goal of 400 million copies of Windows 8, developers will be falling all over themselves to create apps for it.

Still, 100,000-plus apps would be fairly amazing, considering that the Apple Store and Google Play, both mature marketplaces for products that have been out for years, are at about 700,000 and 675,000 apps each, respectively. That doesn't mean Microsoft can't do it -- just that it will take a phenomenal effort on both Microsoft's part and its legion of developers.

Posted by Keith Ward on 10/10/2012 at 1:15 PM


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Reader Comments:

Sat, Feb 2, 2013 Urilas Order Lipitor

With Android and iOS markets that developers can target, there is no incentive to develop for Metro when the environment is just so difficult.

Fri, Jan 25, 2013 Umka Order Lipitor

With Android and iOS markets that developers can target, there is no incentive to develop for Metro when the environment is just so difficult.

Thu, Nov 1, 2012 James

If Microsoft did not make Metro a nightmare for developers then the story would have been different. Unfortunately, MSFT still has not learn the lesson or plan to do anything differently. With Android and iOS markets that developers can target, there is no incentive to develop for Metro when the environment is just so difficult.

Thu, Oct 11, 2012

Interesting to find those unwilling to accept the irreparable harm Microsoft's done to its enterprise credibiity categoried as lizard-brained. They might rightfully categorize those like Ben not as fanboys, but as lemmings, but I'd give the credibility edge to those that have already suffered the consequences of Redmond having so entirely lost its way. Anyone keeping count of the superstars that have either left the company or have run for cover on the Azure team, that apparently a safe haven for those hoping to outlast the Windows 8 debacle already underway?

Thu, Oct 11, 2012 Ben Overmyer Minneapolis, MN

100,000 is a stretch, but we'll see. Ignoring the people who're too lizard-brained to be able to change, Windows 8 is going to be a phenomenal success in 18 months. I'll be developing at least two apps for the Store, and I'm hardly a Microsoft fanboy; the platform just makes sense for what I want to do.

Thu, Oct 11, 2012

They can get bent - so many made this resoundingly clear, but it's "Silverlight or NOTHING". Ridiculously fabricated projections aside, Windows 8 is DOA.

Wed, Oct 10, 2012 Steve

Fugly looking UI on Win 8 is the most glaring blocker for adoption. That was evident from the fair amount of responses that Microsoft chose to ignore.

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