In-Depth

VSLive! FL 2007 Jurassic Code

Learn some ways that you can adapt to rapid changes in the world software development.

Watch the video of the session! (Running time: 1 hour, 3 minutes)

When will today's software development tools and technologies become dinosaurs? It may be sooner than you think. Complexity in software development is reaching critical mass. Microsoft's newest technologies are making current conceptual models of development obsolete.

Given these recent changes, how can you chart your professional development? And how can you adapt your tools to increasing complexity in software? Previous cycles of change in software development can provide some answers to these questions. Examining new dev models from Google to Ruby offer additional clues. Billy Hollis outlines his take on this new era of software development and tells you how to prepare for it.

About the Author

Billy Hollis is an author and software developer from Nashville, Tennessee. Billy is co-author of the first book ever published on Visual Basic .NET, .NET Programming on the Public Beta. He has written many articles, and is a frequent speaker at conferences. He is the Regional Director of Developer Relations in Nashville for Microsoft, and runs a consulting company focusing on Microsoft .NET.

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