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IoT Project AllJoyn To Be Integrated with Windows 10

Microsoft joins an alliance of companies who are working to develop an open source framework and services for Internet of Things-enabled device intercommunication. The results of that work is expected to show up in current versions of Windows and the forthcoming Windows 10.

Microsoft is joining Cisco, Qualcomm and Sony and a growing list of contributors who are jointly developing an open source project that will provide a common framework and services for Internet of Things-connected devices. That project is called AllJoyn and it's headed by the AllSeen Alliance, who held an invite-only event earlier this week for companies supporting the project. Attendees there were among the first participants to see an AllJoyn-enabled Windows 10 preview.

For its part, Microsoft plans to help shape the future of AllJoyn development through engineering suggestions and fully expects to develop services that will allow AllJoyn services to be natively accessible in the forthcoming Windows 10 and older versions of Windows and products, as well as making sure inteoperability is maintained across a variety of operating systems. The effort was detailed in a blog from Olivier Bloch, a technical evangelist with the Microsoft Open Technologies team.

"Microsoft Open Technologies is in charge of making sure these changes are also implemented, working and tested on other platforms, including Linux, Android, iOS, OS X, Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, ensuring interoperability of these changes," blogs Bloch.

AllJoyn is centrally managed in the AllJoyn Core public repository, where Microsoft will maintain updates and changes through the JIRA Tracker hosted version control solution. Currently, there's are various versions of the AllJoyn sofware development kit that support Windows, iOS, OS X, Android and Linux, and developers will be able to use C, Java, JavaScript, Objective-C to build apps with it. The SDK versions are accessible here.

Participants in Microsoft's Windows Insider program will be apprised of developments and updates to the project, so it behooves anyone interested in building apps for IoT-connected devices to register here. There are numerous resources available online that show AllJoyn being used in Visual Studio projects, but a good start are the examples from the hypernephelist blog here.

Some background information on AllJoyn: The AllJoyn project originally was developed by the Qualcomm Innovation Center at Qualcomm and officially debuted at Mobile Congress 2011, according to this Wikipedia entry. Shortly after, source code was signed over for management by The Linux Foundation, and has been actively managed and promoted by The AllSeen Alliance ever since. Alliance members include a diverse list of companies, from Qualcomm to Sharp to Haier.

About the Author

You Tell 'Em, Readers: If you've read this far, know that Michael Domingo, Visual Studio Magazine Editor in Chief, is here to serve you, dear readers, and wants to get you the information you so richly deserve. What news, content, topics, issues do you want to see covered in Visual Studio Magazine? He's listening at mdomingo@1105media.com.

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