News

Performance, Scalability Improved in SQL Server 2012 SP3

Latest service pack comes more than a year after the last service pack, and also adds a number of enhanced monitoring capabilities.

It's been a long time coming -- nearly a year and a half since Service Pack 2 -- but Microsoft has finally released SQL Server 2012 Service Pack 3, which includes performance, scalability and diagnostics workload improvements.

SP2 featured supportability and functionality fixes to AlwaysOn, cube creation support for Analysis services, a fix for Integration Services and some performance fixes to the product's relational engine and storage engine, among numerous other new features. The storage engine's scalability and performance are further improved in SP3, Microsoft said in a blog post last week. Other key updates listed by Microsoft include:

  • Improvements in consistency check performance.
  • Query hints to provide granular control while using Resource Governor.
  • Additional monitoring capabilities through enhancements in DMV, Extended Events and Query Plans.
  • Improved performance while opening and reading XEL files using XEvent Linq reader.
  • Improved performance for spatial queries.

blog post from the SQL Server Engineering Team provides more technical details of the various enhancements, ranging from performance and scalability improvements such as better consistency check performance achieved by "estimating memory grants correctly and making optimum use of CPU and memory" to better query performance troubleshooting via reporting of "information on memory grants, degree of parallelism and the threads used for executing the query."

In the coming weeks, Microsoft said it would delve even further into technical details of the updates on the Tiger blog.

In the meantime, SP3 is available to all customers with existing SQL Server 2012 deployments from the Microsoft Download Center and is slated to become available via Microsoft Update on Tuesday of next week, followed by other distribution avenues in following weeks, such as MSDN, Microsoft Action Pack Subscription (MAPS)/Microsoft Partner Network (MPN), MBS/Partner Source and the Microsoft Volume Licensing Service Center (VLSC).

About the Author

David Ramel is an editor and writer for Converge360.

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • AI for GitHub Collaboration? Maybe Not So Much

    No doubt GitHub Copilot has been a boon for developers, but AI might not be the best tool for collaboration, according to developers weighing in on a recent social media post from the GitHub team.

  • Visual Studio 2022 Getting VS Code 'Command Palette' Equivalent

    As any Visual Studio Code user knows, the editor's command palette is a powerful tool for getting things done quickly, without having to navigate through menus and dialogs. Now, we learn how an equivalent is coming for Microsoft's flagship Visual Studio IDE, invoked by the same familiar Ctrl+Shift+P keyboard shortcut.

  • .NET 9 Preview 3: 'I've Been Waiting 9 Years for This API!'

    Microsoft's third preview of .NET 9 sees a lot of minor tweaks and fixes with no earth-shaking new functionality, but little things can be important to individual developers.

  • Data Anomaly Detection Using a Neural Autoencoder with C#

    Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research tackles the process of examining a set of source data to find data items that are different in some way from the majority of the source items.

  • What's New for Python, Java in Visual Studio Code

    Microsoft announced March 2024 updates to its Python and Java extensions for Visual Studio Code, the open source-based, cross-platform code editor that has repeatedly been named the No. 1 tool in major development surveys.

Subscribe on YouTube