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Docker for Windows, Mac Now Available

The container technology company has made its tools that allow for streamlining the process of spinning up and managing Docker containers on Windows and Mac environments generally available.

The Windows and Mac toolsets for working with Docker containers that were released to beta testers back in March are now generally available. With official availability comes official support for those who are using Docker containers in production environments.

Most of the feature sets of both versions of the Docker tools have been known for some time, having been in beta testing since March. The biggest highlight of the betas and these releases is that there's no longer a need for an interim tool -- in this case, the use of Oracle's VirtualBox technology -- to spin up containers on Windows or Mac. Now, Docker containers will run as a native app under the Apple Hypervisor framework for Mac deployments, and on Hyper-V for those running Windows 10.

Docker for Mac and Windowss also includes improved tool integration, so there's no need to look outside of the toolset to start developing apps locally. It also improves on development flow, with "volume mounting for your code and data, and easy access to running containers on the localhost network," write Michael Chiang, Docker's senior product manager, in a blog post. He notes that apps can also be debugged live and in-container using the preferred Mac or Windows IDE.

Docker for Mac/Windows is also updated to support the most recent Docker release, version 1.12, which has a number of improvements and enhancements, including built-in orchestration, end-to-end encryption, and services that are "replicated, distributed, load balanced processes running on a swarm of Engines."

Docker for Mac/Windows is being developed under two parallel channels, called stable and beta, links of which are available at the end of Chiang's blog. The beta channel is for developers who want to continue running the beta versions, which includes features and updates as soon as they're available for testing, while the stable releases are for developers who are developing apps aimed at production environments.

About the Author

Michael Domingo is a long-time software publishing veteran, having started up and managed several developer publications for the Clipper compiler, Microsoft Access, and Visual Basic. He's also managed IT pubs for 1105 Media, including Microsoft Certified Professional Magazine and Virtualization Review before landing his current gig as Visual Studio Magazine Editor in Chief. Besides his publishing life, he's a professional photographer, whose work can be found by Googling domingophoto.

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