Connection Strings

Rapid UWP Creation with Windows Template Studio 1.1

Windows Template Studio, the wizard-based coding engine for Windows 10 UWP apps, gains momentum with a newer point release this week. Also, in this week's .NET Insight Podcast, we ask: Who are your programming heroes?

Michael Crump might be familiar to most of you out there, but if not, know that he's a senior program manager within Microsoft's Azure division who is popular on the conference circuit for his talks on software development. You can also often find him blogging on his site at http://michaelcrump.net/. Some recent topics: enabling Azure CLI with Bash; a series on exploring Docker for Windows; XAML and Visual Layer interop; enhancing UX design with iconography. To be sure, his stuff is esoteric, but also accessible and practical.

Crump has also, in the past, written for Visual Studio Magazine, and he's also written for other publications.

As if he's not busy enough he, along with Clint Rutkas (another Microsoft PM), has created a Visual Studio 2017 extension that can be used to build Universal Windows Platform projects using a wizards-based UI and targeting Windows 10 environments, called Windows Template Studio.

"Windows Template Studio addresses a top community ask in our developer survey to make it easier and provide guidance to create new projects that target the Universal Windows Platform," wrote Crump and Rutkas, in a blog announcing version 1.0 back in May. WTS, it seems, has roots in a tool called Windows App Studio, used for wizard-based app creation. He adds: "We are taking our learnings from the code generation engine and the existing wizard to provide a strong foundation for our code generation and developer experience in Windows Template Studio."

WTS is an open source project on GitHub, and it's currently at version 1.1 as of earlier this week. New in that version are some wizard improvements, including the addition of some code analysis, localization, renaming of pages and background tasks, and a handful of template improvements (covered in more detail in this blog post).

And for those who want to stretch out WTS, Crump links to this WTS resource page.

In this episode of the .NET Insight Podcast, we ask: Who are your programming heroes, or who influenced your decision to steer into a career with technology and computers? Also, some comments on my "Viva, Visual Basic!" column.

Links mentioned in this show:

Here are a handful of other links we've run across that might be useful to you, in no particular order and definitely not conforming to any particular theme:

Know of an interesting link, or does your company have a new or updated product or service targeted at Visual Studio developers? Tell me about it at mdomingo@1105media.com.

About the Author

Michael Domingo is a long-time software publishing veteran, having started up and managed developer publications for the Clipper compiler, Microsoft Access, and Visual Basic. For 1105 Media, he managed MCPmag.com, Virtualization Review, and was Editor in Chief of Visual Studio Magazine and host of The .NET Insight Podcast until 2017. Contact him via his photography Web site at http://domingophoto.com.

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • How to Do Naive Bayes with Numeric Data Using C#

    Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research uses a full code sample and screenshots to demonstrate how to create a naive Bayes classification system when the predictor values are numeric, using the C# language without any special code libraries.

  • Vortex

    Open Source 'Infrastructure-as-Code' SDK Adds .NET Core Support for Working with Azure

    Pulumi, known for its "Infrastructure-as-Code" cloud development tooling, has added support for .NET Core, letting .NET-centric developers use C#, F# and VB.NET to create, deploy, and manage Azure infrastructure.

  • .NET Framework Not Forgotten: Repair Tool Updated

    Even though Microsoft's development focus has shifted to the open-source, cross-platform .NET Core initiative -- with the aging, traditional, Windows-only .NET Framework relegated primarily to fixes and maintenance such as quality and reliability improvements -- the latter is still getting some other attention, as exemplified in a repair tool update.

  • How to Work with C# Vectors and Matrices for Machine Learning

    Here's a hands-on tutorial from bona-fide data scientist Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research to get you up to speed with machine learning development using C#, complete with code listings and graphics.

  • Sign

    Working with Claims to Authorize Users in ASP.NET Core and Blazor

    When you need to integrate authorizing the user to perform some activity (or just want to retrieve information about the current user), you need to work with the ClaimsPrincipal’s Claims objects. Here’s everything you might want to do.

.NET Insight

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.

Upcoming Events