News

VS Code March 2019 Release Is a Snap (Linux, That Is)

Using the new Visual Studio Code 1.33 (March 2019 version) is a snap -- of the Linux variety that lets the popular open source code editor be distributed as a snap package.

Editor's note: this article has been corrected to clarify that v1.33 is the VS Code March release, though the announcement post was published in April.

"We now fully support distributing Visual Studio Code as a snap package," Microsoft said in an announcement post. "Snaps work across many different Linux distributions, provide reliable execution environments for a much stabler VS Code, and support background updates. Yes, that's right, you now get in-product automatic updates for Linux just as the Windows and macOS users do."

An Ubuntu post announcing the new snappiness explains that: "Snaps are containerized software packages designed to work across cloud, desktop and IoT devices. They work natively on most popular Linux distributions and feature automatic updates and rollback functionality, enhanced security and greater flexibility for developers working within Linux environments."

VS Code is featured in the Snap Store (or, if you're an "Insider," here).

"Visual Studio Code is hugely popular, and it's fantastic that we're able to help it extend its reach into the Linux ecosystem," commented Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, which does the Ubuntu distro. "Developers are the lifeblood of snaps and it is great to see this recognition from Microsoft as they join a host of others who can now provide their users with the latest updates seamlessly, and with assurance of rollbacks and containment."

The new VS Code release otherwise features a slew of new features, tweaks and fixes, neatly summarized by Microsoft like this:

Or, if you prefer your new features summarized by category, Microsoft took care of that, too:

  • Workbench: Improved Source Control view, easier list navigation with screen readers.
  • Integrated Terminal: ConPTY on by default on Windows, rendering performance improvements.
  • Languages: Disable CSS property value completions, TS improved inference and const assertions.
  • Extension Authoring: Finalized smart selection API, install extension command.
  • Engineering: Official Linux snap package, faster OSS builds with NPM package caching.

About the Author

David Ramel is an editor and writer for Converge360.

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • Move Over, Stack Overflow: Microsoft Launches Q&A for .NET

    Stack Overflow probably isn't worried, but Microsoft has launched its own Q&A site for all things .NET, seeking to provide a one-stop-shop for getting .NET technical questions answered by the community.

  • Developer Decries WinForms-to-Blazor Performance Degradation

    Since shipping .NET 5, Visual Studio 2019 v16.8 and more goodies recently, Microsoft has been touting speed improvements in many components -- including the red-hot Blazor project -- but some real-world developers are finding different results.

  • Google Cloud Functions Supports .NET Core 3.1 (but not .NET 5)

    Google Cloud Functions -- often used for serverless, event-driven projects -- now supports .NET, but the new support is a release behind Microsoft's latest .NET offering.

  • Binary Classification Using PyTorch: Model Accuracy

    In the final article of a four-part series on binary classification using PyTorch, Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research shows how to evaluate the accuracy of a trained model, save a model to file, and use a model to make predictions.

  • Visual Basic in .NET 5: Ready for WinForms Apps

    With the milestone .NET 5 and Visual Studio 2019 v16.8 releases now out, Microsoft is reminding Visual Basic coders that their favorite programming language enjoys full support and the troublesome Windows Forms Designer is even complete -- almost.

Upcoming Events