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Microsoft Unleashes SDK For SSDS

Microsoft yesterday released a software development kit for SQL Server Data Services, its forthcoming cloud-based service that will let organizations store and query data.

The first beta of SSDS was released back in March, announced with much fanfare at the Mix08 Conference by Microsoft chief software architect Ray Ozzie

The SDK includes the command-line tool and the SSDS Explorer demonstrated by Soumitra Sengupta at TechEd back in Orlando in June. "The team would appreciate if you can give it a spin and let us know what you like, what you do not like and above all file bugs that you see," Sengupta wrote in an MSDN posting yesterday. Testers do need an SSDS account in order to use the SDK, he noted. The SDK can be downloaded here.

Sengupta also suggests Microsoft may open up the SSDS tools. "I am personally curious to find out if there is any interest in the community to take over the code base for these tools," he asked in a follow-up post late yesterday.

If you haven't paid much attention to SSDS, perhaps you should -- it appears to be a key component of Microsoft's plan to offer a cloud-based repository for data-driven content. Microsoft, Google and others are looking to the success Amazon.com is having with its S3 cloud-based repository and the companies have come to the conclusion that this is the future of enterprise computing.

Have you looked at SSDS and the new SDK? Please share your stories with us.

Posted by Jeffrey Schwartz on 08/20/2008 at 1:15 PM


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