Data Driver

Blog archive

New Help For SQL Server Setup

A reader has prompted Microsoft to launch a vast new resource for easing the SQL Server set-up process.

Okay, just maybe it's a coincidence. Anyway, reader Brian M.'s complaint about the difficulties of installing SQL Server seems to have hit the nail on the head. Last week he commented on my post concerning a "SQL Meme" circulating the 'Net, gathering gripes about SQL Server.

Brian's contribution started out with this: "Obviously an installer written by a bunch of CompSci PhD's. Ridiculous."

Just as obvious: Ballmer & Co. hang on every word printed here (Hi Steve--call me!).

Yesterday, just six days later, Microsoft announced the "The SQL Server Setup Portal," described as "a one-stop-shop for everything you need to know about planning and setting up SQL Server." They may as well have put "Hey, Brian..." in the portal title.

Buck Woody, a Microsoft database specialist, admitted in his Carpe Datum blog announcing the portal that the set-up process can be difficult. Pointing out the myriad hardware/software driver combinations supported by Microsoft, he said, "Making all of that work together is a small miracle, so things are bound to arise that you need to deal with."

You don't need to tell Brian M. He said he's been trying for a week to set up R2, with at least a dozen attempts, with no success. He even hinted at shooting himself in the foot, while waiting for the "R2 Pre-install Cleanup/Fixit Package."

Well Brian, hold your fire. Here's help: "whitepapers, videos, and multiple places to search on everything from topic names to error codes."

And no thanks needed; that's what we're here for. Just please let us know how it turns out.

What SQL Server installation nightmares have you encountered? Does the new portal help? Comment here or send me an e-mail.

Posted by David Ramel on 05/18/2010 at 1:23 PM


comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • Visual Studio Code Dev Team Cleans Up

    The Visual Studio Code development team focused on some housekeeping in the October update, closing more than 4,000 issues on GitHub, where the cross-platform, open-source editor lives.

  • ML.NET Model Builder Update Boosts Image Classification

    Microsoft announced an update to the Model Builder component of its ML.NET machine learning framework, boosting image classification and adding "try your model" functionality for predictions with sample input.

  • How to Do Naive Bayes with Numeric Data Using C#

    Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research uses a full code sample and screenshots to demonstrate how to create a naive Bayes classification system when the predictor values are numeric, using the C# language without any special code libraries.

  • Vortex

    Open Source 'Infrastructure-as-Code' SDK Adds .NET Core Support for Working with Azure

    Pulumi, known for its "Infrastructure-as-Code" cloud development tooling, has added support for .NET Core, letting .NET-centric developers use C#, F# and VB.NET to create, deploy, and manage Azure infrastructure.

  • .NET Framework Not Forgotten: Repair Tool Updated

    Even though Microsoft's development focus has shifted to the open-source, cross-platform .NET Core initiative -- with the aging, traditional, Windows-only .NET Framework relegated primarily to fixes and maintenance such as quality and reliability improvements -- the latter is still getting some other attention, as exemplified in a repair tool update.

.NET Insight

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.

Upcoming Events