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New Help For SQL Server Setup

A reader has prompted Microsoft to launch a vast new resource for easing the SQL Server set-up process.

Okay, just maybe it's a coincidence. Anyway, reader Brian M.'s complaint about the difficulties of installing SQL Server seems to have hit the nail on the head. Last week he commented on my post concerning a "SQL Meme" circulating the 'Net, gathering gripes about SQL Server.

Brian's contribution started out with this: "Obviously an installer written by a bunch of CompSci PhD's. Ridiculous."

Just as obvious: Ballmer & Co. hang on every word printed here (Hi Steve--call me!).

Yesterday, just six days later, Microsoft announced the "The SQL Server Setup Portal," described as "a one-stop-shop for everything you need to know about planning and setting up SQL Server." They may as well have put "Hey, Brian..." in the portal title.

Buck Woody, a Microsoft database specialist, admitted in his Carpe Datum blog announcing the portal that the set-up process can be difficult. Pointing out the myriad hardware/software driver combinations supported by Microsoft, he said, "Making all of that work together is a small miracle, so things are bound to arise that you need to deal with."

You don't need to tell Brian M. He said he's been trying for a week to set up R2, with at least a dozen attempts, with no success. He even hinted at shooting himself in the foot, while waiting for the "R2 Pre-install Cleanup/Fixit Package."

Well Brian, hold your fire. Here's help: "whitepapers, videos, and multiple places to search on everything from topic names to error codes."

And no thanks needed; that's what we're here for. Just please let us know how it turns out.

What SQL Server installation nightmares have you encountered? Does the new portal help? Comment here or send me an e-mail.

Posted by David Ramel on 05/18/2010 at 12:35 PM


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