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How are Database Developers Doing, Salary-Wise?

I noticed in the comprehensive 16th annual IT Salary Survey that database developers lost their No. 1 spot in the category of average base salary by job title, actually falling three rungs down the ladder to No. 4.

Not that $95,212 is that bad. But still, that seemed like kind of a big drop in statistics that don't usually change that much from year to year. In fact, editor Michael Domingo said "Database programmers have been fairly consistent in the rankings, but dropped from the top spot to fourth from a dollar perspective. Still, based on percentages, they managed to go up nearly 7 percent from last year's result." Besides being consistent, database programmers "often rank highest," Domingo said in the more extensive PDF document, downloadable with registration.

So, what does a healthy 7 percent average salary hike combined with the reduced job title salary ranking really mean? It looks like that, while data devs are doing OK, others--especially networking project leads--are just doing a little better.

Indeed, when it comes to "salary by technology expertise," Domingo said, "The biggest gains from a year ago are those with database development skills, earning 6.2 percent higher." In that category, the average salary for those with database development skills was $92,460.

Another survey, conducted by Microsoft Certified Professional Magazine, also had good news for database developers. Domingo edited this one, too (the guy is everywhere). "Network project leads also often do well, but in the scheme of things, it's the DBAs and database developers who came in right above on the salary scale," he said. "DBAs and developers often tell us that they're well compensated and happy with their pay, and this year is no different. It's data, after all, that is at the heart of many businesses and good data people are often plied with incentives to either stay put or lured away to companies who can afford to pay higher salaries."

Whew! I guess that initial ranking drop I mentioned isn't that worrisome after all. Data still rules, and pays the big bucks. Now, for me, it's with relief that I return to wrestling with outer joins and normalization in that "Become a Database Developer in 21 Days" course I paid so much for.

What the heck is a tuple? Clue me in or comment otherwise, or drop me a line.

Posted by David Ramel on 08/04/2011 at 1:15 PM


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