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Add a Shortcut to Frequently Visited Code

I had an application with one section I had to work on every couple of months over several years (the client kept changing its collective minds about how it wanted part of the UI -- a search page -- to work). Eventually, I created a shortcut to the section of code I kept having to change so that I could get there quickly. Adding a shortcut is just one step: Click on a line and type Ctrl+K+H.

Returning to that line requires two steps: First, in any version of Visual Studio, you select Task List from the View menu. After that, though, getting to the list of shortcuts depends on which version of Visual Studio you're using. On some versions, you have a dropdown list underneath the title bar in the Task List -- selecting Shortcuts from that dropdown list lets you see your shortcuts.

If, on the other hand, there is no dropdown list, shortcuts appear mixed in with other Task List items. Either way, once you have the list displayed, you navigate to your selected area by double-clicking on its shortcut in the Task List.

As with any other Task List item, you can't delete a shortcut from within the Task List. If you don't want to keep that shortcut around anymore then you'll need to go to that line of code, click somewhere in it and use Ctrl+K+H again to remove the shortcut.

Posted by Peter Vogel on 10/07/2016 at 1:27 PM


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