The Practical Client


More Cool Stuff in TypeScript 2.0 and 2.1

A roundup of a few more features: deprecated any type, literal datatypes, read-only properties, more!

TypeScript 2.0: More Power for Defining Classes

The latest version of TypeScript provides developers with tools to create base classes and class hierarchies just like the other object-oriented languages.

TypeScript 2.0: Even Better Data Typing and Class Discriminants

If you care about data typing and want to avoid null/undefined errors, there's a lot you're going to like in TypeScript 2.0. And, if you like creating general purpose functions that can work with a variety of classes, there's something here for you, too.

Browsing Objects with IndexedDB

Peter shows how to browse a set of objects in an IndexedDB ObjectStore and, along the way, finishes up his TypeScript/IndexedDB utilities for storing and retrieving large amounts of data on the client.

Leveraging TypeScript When Working with IndexedDB

TypeScript might change the way you design an application that uses IndexedDB.

Storing Lots of Data on the Client in JavaScript and TypeScript

IndexedDB allows you to store data on the client to let the user work offline and to reduce demands on the server. Here's enough code to both get you started and to show you the difference between doing it in JavaScript and doing it in TypeScript.

Declarative Programming in TypeScript with Decorators

If you've used attributes in your C# or Visual Basic programs, then decorators in TypeScript are going to look very familiar to you. They're still in development, but here's a look both at how to use them and how to write them.

Processing Data with ASP.NET MVC, JSX+React and TypeScript

JSX+React provides a flexible way for you to structure your client-side code to two things you want: dynamically transform your page in response to your user's input, and to integrate with ASP.NET MVC action methods.

Integrating ASP.NET MVC, React and JSX with TypeScript

Creating a form with TypeScript, React and JSX lets you generate the HTML for your form dynamically, at runtime, and on the user's computer. Here's how to integrate a data- driven form into ASP.NET MVC.

Generate TypeScript Classes from C# with TypeScriptSyntaxPaste

When working with TypeScript it's not unusual to need a class that matches an already existing server-side class written in C#. Here's one way to get from C# to TypeScript by doing what you normally do.

Eliminate the Barrier Between JavaScript and HTML (or Anything Else)

The JSX tool lets you describe your page as a set of custom elements that you define in TypeScript classes. Those elements then add to the page whatever text or code makes sense to you.

Features That Will Matter in the Upcoming TypeScript 1.8

There are lots of enhancements waiting for you in TypeScript 1.8, including features that make it easier to move your project to TypeScript, that protect you from errors and that give you even better control over data types.

Creating Type-Safe Structures (and Dictionaries) with Tuples

When classes are more structure than you need, tuples let you specify simple type-safe aggregates of other data types. They'll also let you create a dictionary collection…but it won't be type-safe.

Exploiting TypeScript Arrays

TypeScript doesn't have the rich set of native collection classes that you're used to in the .NET Framework -- instead, it has just arrays and tuples. Fortunately, you can do quite a lot with them.

Exploiting Generics in TypeScript

Generic classes and functions are one way to create flexible, reusable classes and functions. But before you start creating your own generic functions, you should be clear on when they’re your best choice.

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