News

Microsoft Releases .NET Framework 4.5.1

64-bit Edit and Continue is the key feature addition.

Related Content:

On the same day Microsoft released the final version of Visual Studio 2013, a less-heralded but critical product for developers also got its official edition: the .NET Framework 4.5.1.

The latest version of .NET is a "customer-focused release", states a blog entry from the ".NET Team" from earlier today. Rather than a raft of bug fixes, this version is more about adding features.

The top feature added was by far the most requested by developers: X64 Edit and Continue (EnC). The delay in adding it, according to the blog, was the necessity to get other features in place first:

"We've wanted to add that feature for a long time, but we always had at least two other features ahead of it in our priority list. This time, we decided that it really needed to get done and didn't bother with any of the priority lists."

X86 EnC has been around since the days of Visual Studio 2005 and the .NET Framework 2.0. But there has been no 64-bit version until now. With X64 EnC, a developer can stop at a breakpoint with edited source in an invalid state. The source can then be made valid, followed by the developer stepping again and continuing to run the application.

The blog pointed to numerous other upgrades as well, including:

Microsoft calls the .NET Framework 4.5.1 a "highly compatible, in-place upgrade" from .NET 4 and .NET 4.5. It's available from the Microsoft Download Center. The Preview version of .NET 4.5.1 was released June 26 of this year.

A key feedback driver for the .NET Framework and Visual Studio products is the Visual Studio UserVoice site, which allows developers to request features, and other developers to vote on them, signifying their agreement with the request. The UserVoice requests that were fulfilled with .NET 4.5.1 are X64 EnC; function return value in the debugger; sorting and filtering in the Code analysis window; and Large Object Heap (LOH) compaction.

About the Author

Keith Ward is the editor in chief of Virtualization & Cloud Review. Follow him on Twitter @VirtReviewKeith.

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • Here's a One-Stop Shop for .NET 5 Improvements

    Culled from reams of Microsoft documentation, here's a high-level summary of what's new for performance, networking, diagnostics and more, along with links to the nitty-gritty details for those wanting to dig in more.

  • Azure SQL Database Ranked Among Top 3 Databases of 2020

    Microsoft touted the inclusion of Azure SQL Database among the top three databases of 2020 in a popularity ranking by DB-Engines, which collects and manages information about database management systems, updating its lists monthly.

  • Time Tracker Says VS Code Is No. 1 Editor for Devs, Some Working 15+ Hours Per Day

    WakaTime, which does time tracking for programmers, released data for 2020 showing that Visual Studio Code is by far the top editor/IDE used by its coders, some of whom are hacking away for more than 15 hours per day.

  • VS Code Java Project Explorer Gets Better

    The recently introduced project view for managing Java projects in Visual Studio Code received several enhancements in the latest update to Java functionality provided in Microsoft's popular open source, cross-platform code editor.

Upcoming Events