News

Build 2014 Dates Announced

Next year's developer show is slated for April 2-4.

Microsoft is going back to San Francisco for its 2014 Build Conference. It will be held in the same venue as the 2013 show, San Francisco's Moscone Center, from April 2-4.

Registration for the show, Microsoft's main developer-focused conference, will open at 9 a.m. PT on Jan. 14, according to a blog post from Steve Guggenheimer, Microsoft's Corporate Vice President and Chief Evangelist, Developer & Platform Evangelism.

More than 6,000 developers attended the 2013 show, according to Microsoft. "At this year's event, we'll talk about what's next for Windows, Windows Phone, Windows Azure, Windows Server, Visual Studio and much more," Guggenheimer blogged. What new product announcements could be made is an open question, but it appears unlikely that many huge unveilings will take place, given the deluge of new products released this year. They include Visual Studio 2013, Windows 8.1, Xbox One and SQL Server 2014, which is at the Community Technology Preview 2 (CTP2) stage right now.

The Build conference resulted from the merging of Microsoft's Professional Developer Conference (PDC) and MIX, its Web development conference, in 2011. The news about dates and the location of the 2013 Build show was first announced at 1105 Media's Visual Studio Live! developer conference in March.

About the Author

Keith Ward is the editor in chief of Virtualization & Cloud Review. Follow him on Twitter @VirtReviewKeith.

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • What's Next for ASP.NET Core and Blazor

    Since its inception as an intriguing experiment in leveraging WebAssembly to enable dynamic web development with C#, Blazor has evolved into a mature, fully featured framework. Integral to the ASP.NET Core ecosystem, Blazor offers developers a unique combination of server-side rendering and rich client-side interactivity.

  • Nearest Centroid Classification for Numeric Data Using C#

    Here's a complete end-to-end demo of what Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research says is arguably the simplest possible classification technique.

  • .NET MAUI in VS Code Goes GA

    Visual Studio Code's .NET MAUI workload, which evolves the former Xamarin.Forms mobile-centric framework by adding support for creating desktop applications, has reached general availability.

  • Visual Studio Devs Quick to Sound Off on Automatic Updates: 'Please No'

    A five-year-old Visual Studio feature request for automatic IDE updates is finally getting enacted by Microsoft amid a lot of initial developer pushback, seemingly misplaced.

  • First Official OpenAI Library for .NET Goes Beta

    Although it seems Microsoft and OpenAI have been deeply intertwined partners for a long time, they are only now getting around to releasing an official OpenAI library for .NET developers, joining existing community libraries.

Subscribe on YouTube