News

.NET Development Available on Red Hat Open Source Platform

The technology was developed by a company founded by two ex-Microsoft executives.

.NET Framework developers have a new Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) option for their applications: Red Hat's OpenShift.

Red Hat, the large open source company that made its name supporting Linux, announced today that its collaborated with Uhuru Software to add .NET and Microsoft SQL Server to its OpenShift platform. "OpenShift can deliver a PaaS solution for .NET that is native to Windows while still enabling the secure, multi-tenant architecture that users have come to expect from our platform," Red Hat Technical Director for OpenShift Chris Morgan blogged.

He said that developers can "easily" write an app with .NET and MySQL completely on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Uhuru, which handled the plumbing, is a two-year old company started by two former Microsoft executives in Jawaid Ekram and Jawad Khaki. It specializes in tying Windows to open source platforms; it already supports Windows on Cloud Foundry, for instance.

Uhuru described how the integration works:

"Uhuru has done a thorough implementation of the OpenShift environment on Windows and used native C# code wherever possible for maximum reliability and compatibility. Windows Server is a fully functional OpenShift node managed via SSH just like Linux nodes.

We have also built cartridges for .NET and Microsoft SQL Server. .NET applications benefit from the autoscaling capabilities of OpenShift and can easily ramp up capacity by provisioning additional gears just as any other OpenShift app."

The packages for using OpenShift are available on GitHub.

About the Author

Keith Ward is the editor in chief of Virtualization & Cloud Review. Follow him on Twitter @VirtReviewKeith.

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • Vendors Update Controls for .NET Core 3.1, Blazor

    This week saw two third-party vendors of dev tools -- UX and UI toolkits and controls -- release new offerings that include support for two of Microsoft's main open source frameworks, the cross-platform .NET Core 3.1 and Blazor, which allows for creating browser-based web applications with C# instead of JavaScript.

  • C++ Is Focus of New Visual Studio 2019 v16.7 Preview 2

    C++ development is a focus point of the new Visual Studio 2019 v16.7 Preview 2, featuring a slew of tweaks and improvements touching upon remote SSH connections, IntelliSense support and more.

  • Clustering Non-Numeric Data Using C#

    Clustering non-numeric -- or categorial -- data is surprisingly difficult, but it's explained here by resident data scientist Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research, who provides all the code you need for a complete system using an algorithm based on a metric called category utility (CU), a measure how much information you gain by clustering.

  • So What's Up with Microsoft's (and Everyone Else's) Love of Rust?

    Microsoft already stewards several popular programming languages -- C#, TypeScript, F# -- so what's up with its love of Rust, along with the rest of the world?

  • C# Steps Up Programming Language Popularity Ladder

    Microsoft's C# programming language climbed a year-over-year notch on the TIOBE Index, which measures popularity among developers.

.NET Insight

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.

Upcoming Events