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ReactiveUI 6.0 Rounds Out Windows, Xamarin Support

MVVM framework for working with Reactive Extensions in the .NET Framework updated to support Universal Windows Phone and Xamarin forms.

Developer Paul Betts blogged about a release of his ReactiveUI that now has support for Windows Runtime (WinRT) Universal Apps and Xamarin forms, as well as a rollup of more than 120 features. Version 6.0 is available on the NuGet gallery.

ReactiveUI 6.0 is a Model-View-ViewModel framework that's used along with the Reactive Extensions library, mainly used for creating testable UIs.

New in this release:

  • More Windows Phone, Xamarin forms support: Updated to support Universal Windows apps, WinRT Universal apps, and Xamarin Forms (via a ReactiveUI-XamForms NuGet package).
  • Improved Android and iOS support, with helpers for the Android Support library via the ReactiveUI-AndroidSupport package.
  • Support for recycling list-based views in Android and iOS.

Besides this list, Betts said that improvements were made in areas of performance and memory management. "ReactiveUI 6.0 is much less prone to creating memory leaks in application code via WeakEventManager," he wrote.

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