News

Azure DocumentDB Goes Live

Microsoft announced general availability of its NoSQL service for developers and IT pros.

Microsoft last week made its Azure DocumentDB service to the public. Azure DocumentDB is a NoSQL database service that's designed to store document data in the JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) format. That data can then be queried using the SQL language.

Azure DocumentDB permits the complex querying of mobile and Web application data without having to worry about mismatch issues between application schema and database schema, according to a Microsoft description. It was designed to scale to meet operational demands, and so the service is billed by the hour based on performance levels that can be changed on the fly.

The service exposes resources through a RESTful APIs, but Microsoft also supports the use of ".NET, Node, Java and Python" libraries. It's possible to manage Azure DocumentDB resources via REST paths, the Azure portal or PowerShell scripts.

Developers have been opting to use NoSQL databases as "the tool of choice," according to Microsoft's announcement, so Azure DocumentDB is designed to alleviate the setup and management hassles of running a NoSQL database. Microsoft provides full management support for the Azure DocumentDB service, as well as a 99.95 percent service level agreement.

Microsoft describes the pricing for Azure DocumentDB at this page. While the service is generally available now for commercial use, it's not clear where it's available. For instance, it's not yet available in the South Central U.S. region, according to Microsoft's announcement.

Also available today is a "new open source data migration tool" that is designed to make it easier to move data stored on other database systems to the Azure DocumentDB service. The tool is demonstrated in this Microsoft Channel 9 video.

About the Author

Kurt Mackie is senior news producer for 1105 Media's Converge360 group.

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • VS Code Update Adds Python Tutorials

    The Visual Studio Code dev team added new Python tutorials as part of the regular monthly update, this one for March 2020, bringing the open-source, cross-platform code editor to version 1.44.

  • Top 3 Blazor Extensions for Visual Studio Code

    Some developers prefer to create applications with Microsoft's open-source Blazor tooling from within the open-source, cross-platform Visual Studio Code editor. Here are the top tools in the VS Code Marketplace for those folk, as measured by the number of installations.

  • How to Invert a Machine Learning Matrix Using C#

    VSM Senior Technical Editor Dr. James McCaffrey, of Microsoft Research, explains why inverting a matrix -- one of the more common tasks in data science and machine learning -- is difficult and presents code that you can use as-is, or as a starting point for custom matrix inversion scenarios.

  • Microsoft Engineer: 'It's Time to Move OData to .NET 5'

    Microsoft engineer Sam Xu says "it’s time to move OData to .NET 5" and in a new blog post he shows how to do just that.

  • Microsoft Goes Virtual with Developer Education in Face of COVID-19

    Like many organizations that host developer educational events, Microsoft has gone virtual amid shelter-in-place directives and a surge in remote work stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic.

.NET Insight

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.

Upcoming Events