News

License Changes Mean More TFS 2015 Feature Flexibility

Changes in licensing allows anyone with the basic CAL to get access to features that were available only to premium subscribers.

Team Foundation Server 2015 wasn't released with the rest of the products earlier this week, but there have been a few developments on TFS as it makes its way to being feature complete. Earlier this week, Microsoft's Brian Harry blogged about some of the licensing changes that affect the types of services that will be made available.

For one, there have been changes to specific Agile Project Management features -- agile planning, chart authoring, team rooms, and the Web-based test experience from within the test hub -- that allow for those features to be used with a basic TFS CAL. "Many features that were only available if you purchased VS Premium with MSDN, VS Ultimate with MSDN or Test Professional with MSDN are now available in the TFS CAL," writes Harry.

The Visual Studio Test Professional Subscription licensing has also been tweaked, in which VS Online user can now use Test Professional for $60 per month. Harry wrote that user feedback showed some popularity for allowing users to get at Test Professionals "full set of testing capabilities, including lab management, rich data collectors." At some point, Harry wrote, the changes will filter down so users can take advantage of those testing features using on-premises TFS 2015.

Two non-licensing changes might also have some impact on TFS users. One is the integration of Team Explorer UI into the suite, which means it can no longer be used stand-alone. It has the potential to impact "non-developer users who want to use our Office integration capabilities," he wrote. "As such, in the TFS 2015 Update 1 timeframe, we will create a new installer that has just the Office integration and related components (without the Team Explorer VS shell). Until then, I'd recommend non-developers continue to use Team Explorer 2013."

The other new change is storyboarding, which will be added to TFS 2015 at Update 1; meanwhile, that feature is now available in Visual Studio 2015 Community Edition.

There are a number of other changes affecting TFS 2015 and VS 2015 that Harry details in his blog here.

About the Author

You Tell 'Em, Readers: If you've read this far, know that Michael Domingo, Visual Studio Magazine Editor in Chief, is here to serve you, dear readers, and wants to get you the information you so richly deserve. What news, content, topics, issues do you want to see covered in Visual Studio Magazine? He's listening at [email protected].

comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • What's Next for ASP.NET Core and Blazor

    Since its inception as an intriguing experiment in leveraging WebAssembly to enable dynamic web development with C#, Blazor has evolved into a mature, fully featured framework. Integral to the ASP.NET Core ecosystem, Blazor offers developers a unique combination of server-side rendering and rich client-side interactivity.

  • Nearest Centroid Classification for Numeric Data Using C#

    Here's a complete end-to-end demo of what Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research says is arguably the simplest possible classification technique.

  • .NET MAUI in VS Code Goes GA

    Visual Studio Code's .NET MAUI workload, which evolves the former Xamarin.Forms mobile-centric framework by adding support for creating desktop applications, has reached general availability.

  • Visual Studio Devs Quick to Sound Off on Automatic Updates: 'Please No'

    A five-year-old Visual Studio feature request for automatic IDE updates is finally getting enacted by Microsoft amid a lot of initial developer pushback, seemingly misplaced.

  • First Official OpenAI Library for .NET Goes Beta

    Although it seems Microsoft and OpenAI have been deeply intertwined partners for a long time, they are only now getting around to releasing an official OpenAI library for .NET developers, joining existing community libraries.

Subscribe on YouTube