Practical .NET

Let Other Processes Run When Debugging One Process

When you hit a breakpoint in Visual Studio, everything stops. If you'd rather other processes keep running, you can enable that.

If you've set multiple start projects to run when you start debugging, you may have noticed that when you hit a breakpoint in any project, all the other projects stop also. If you'd prefer that they kept running (so that, for example, you can access them through the Immediate window), you can have that.

Just go to Tools | Options | Debugging | General and uncheck "Break all processes when one process breaks" (don't take that word "break" too seriously -- it means "break" as in "breakpoint").

About the Author

Peter Vogel is a system architect and principal in PH&V Information Services. PH&V provides full-stack consulting from UX design through object modeling to database design. Peter tweets about his VSM columns with the hashtag #vogelarticles. His blog posts on user experience design can be found at http://blog.learningtree.com/tag/ui/.

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