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GrapeCity Offers Spreadsheet Server API Across .NET Platforms

GrapeCity Developer Solutions enhanced its portfolio of .NET developer components with a new spreadsheet server API for creating and working with Microsoft Excel-compatible spreadsheets.

Called Spread.Services, the new offering simplifies the creation, conversion and sharing of spreadsheets across Windows, Android and Mono platforms, while supporting .NET Core 2.0 and targeting .NET Standard 1.4 for multi-platform support.

"Using Spread.Services, developers can easily implement code to process, collate, and consolidate data from large sets of spreadsheet documents, including reports, itineraries, and financial analyses," the Microsoft Visual Studio Partner said earlier this month.

"Advanced calculations become lightning-fast with more than 450 built-in Excel-compatible formula functions. Rich data entry forms are easily created using data validation rules and formulas. Spread.Services also enhances security -- users can hide formulas, sheets, and other objects from the end user and set locked and protected ranges and sheets with password protection."

The company said the API allows calls from nearly any application or platform, without relying upon an Excel dependency.

"We model our interface-based API on Excel's document object model," the API's site says. "This means that you can import, calculate, query, generate and export any spreadsheet scenario." Furthermore, any spreadsheets -- whether created or imported -- can contain references to one another, including:

  • Full reports
  • Sorted and filtered tables
  • Sorted and filtered pivot tables
  • Charts
  • Sparklines
  • Conditional formats
  • Dashboard reports

Available in a free trial, the API is listed among a number of other Spread-related offerings, with pricing available here.

About the Author

David Ramel is an editor and writer for Converge360.

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