News

GrapeCity Update Includes .NET Standard Template for Xamarin Mobile Development

Visual Studio and .NET component specialist GrapeCity Inc.'s latest update features better data visualization, new project templates -- including a new .NET Standard project for Xamarin mobile development -- and more.

The company provides .NET controls for desktop, Web and native mobile projects with its ComponentOne line, and JavaScript/HTML5 controls written in TypeScript in its Wijmo offering.

One new feature of special interest to mobile developers is a new .NET Standard project template for Visual Studio, as part of the company's ComponentOne Studio for Xamarin.

Introduced in 2016, NET Standard provides a formal specification of .NET APIs that should be available on all .NET implementations, getting a big boost with the release of .NET Standard 2.0 last year.

With ComponentOne Studio for Xamarin 2018 v1, mobile developers can get a jumpstart in developing cross-platform iOS and Android apps based on Microsoft's Xamarin technology.

"We've added a new .NET Standard project template for Visual Studio 2017," the company said in a blog post this week. "This template should help you modernize your Xamarin.Forms projects as the .NET platform continues to evolve."

Other release features spotlighted by GrapeCity include:

  • A new MultiSelect input control that extends ComboBox and adds checkboxes so users can select multiple items from the dropdown. It's available for WinForms, WPF and UWP.
  • New project templates in WinForms, WPF and ASP.NET MVC designed to ease the creation of new projects in Visual Studio. Also, ASP.NET MVC features a new Razor Pages scaffolder.
  • Additional FlexChart charts and features including Pareto chart, axis grouping, options for managing overlapping in axis and data labels, and custom legend icons.
  • The ability for users to execute samples and demos directly from their desktop with the ComponentOne Samples Explorer, along with a full Dashboard Demo for ASP.NET MVC.

On the JavaScript side of things, the company highlighted a new licensing mechanism, along with component enhancements and new functionality.

The company provides more details on all the updates here.

All the new releases are available in a free 30-day trial.

About the Author

David Ramel is the editor of Visual Studio Magazine.

comments powered by Disqus
Most   Popular
Upcoming Events

.NET Insight

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.