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Microsoft Patches .NET Core Security Vulnerability

Microsoft published a security advisory yesterday to warn of a denial-of-service vulnerability in .NET Core and .NET native version 2.0 and provide guidance on how to address it with a new update.

The easiest way for .NET Core developers to dodge the vulnerability is to just use the .NET Core 2.1 Release Candidate 1, just shipped this week during the company's Build developer conference.

"Microsoft is aware of a denial-of-service vulnerability that exists when .NET Framework and .NET Core improperly process XML documents," the company said in its advisory yesterday that announced the release of the .NET Core May 2018 Update to provide a fix. "An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could cause a denial of service against a .NET Framework, .NET Core, or .NET native application.

The update addresses the vulnerability by correcting how .NET Framework, .NET Core, and .NET native applications handle XML document processing."

Note that applications that don't process signed XML are not affected, nor are applications that target .NET Core 1.x or .NET Framework 1.x.

Otherwise, developers working on ASP.NET Core applications are advised to adopt ASP.NET Core 2.0.8.

Developers can get the May update from the .NET Core download page or via NuGet with the Microsoft.AspNetCore.All package.

Otherwise, as mentioned, .NET Core developers can just move on to the new .NET Core 2.1 RC. Microsoft said ".NET Core 2.1 RC 1 includes these fixes. No update is required for .NET Core 2.1 RC 1."

Docker images have also been updated for the May update, Microsoft said.

For more details, consult the CVE-2018-0765: .NET Core Denial Of Service Vulnerability site.

About the Author

David Ramel is an editor and writer for Converge360.

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