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Visual Studio 2019 Launch Set for April 2

A Microsoft Visual Studio 2019 Launch Event site indicates Visual Studio 2019 will lift off in 53 days, 16 hours and 28 minutes (at the time of this writing) -- in other words, at 9 a.m. PT on Tuesday, April 2.

The company just shipped Visual Studio 2019 Preview 3 yesterday, following up on the second preview, which enhanced the IDE in several development areas such as C#, Python, Web/container and so on, along with several tweaks designed to improve the "core IDE experience."

Speaking of "core," Microsoft also detailed how tooling for .NET Core -- the company's new modular, open, cross-platform implementation of .NET -- has improved in VS 2019.

In Preview 3, more new features and functionality were listed for the IDE, debugging and diagnostics, extensibility, C++, F#, Web technologies, Universal Windows Platform (UWP) and more.

For the big April 2 reveal, Microsoft is planning to help organize local, in-person launch events that will run until the end of June.

Regarding the company's launch event, the company today said: "Scott Hanselman will kick off the day with an online keynote highlighting the newest innovations in Visual Studio. Be prepared to be delighted and ready to return to your coding even more productively than before! The keynote will be followed by several live-streamed sessions, hosted by experts with online Q&A, that dive deeper into various features and programming languages. We'll close out the day with a virtual attendee party sponsored by our Visual Studio ecosystem partners, so make sure you stick around!"

About the Author

David Ramel is an editor and writer for Converge360.

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