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Azure Functions Runtime 3.0 Now GA, with Support for .NET Core 3.1

Microsoft said Azure Functions Runtime 3.0 is now generally available for production use, sporting support for .NET Core 3.1 and Node 12 among other capabilities.

Azure Functions enables serverless computing, in which small pieces of code, or functions, are run, typically in response to events, without developers having to worry about application infrastructure.

The company last month had declared "Azure Functions 3.0 go-live release is now available," but with a caveat:

"While the runtime is now ready for production, and most of the tooling and performance optimizations are rolling out soon, there are still some tooling improvements to come before we announce Functions 3.0 as the default for new apps (see the progress of known tooling gaps). We plan to announce Functions 3.0 as the default version for new apps in January 2020."

Last week, the company apparently did just that.

"Azure Functions 3.0 is now generally available, so it's now possible to build and deploy functions with the 3.0 runtime version in production," a blog post said.

The release is backwards-compatible, so developers should be able to upgrade existing apps running on older language versions without any code changes. Also, production apps running on the new runtime are eligible for support.

"Applications running on earlier versions of the Azure Functions runtime will continue to be supported and we're not deprecating either 1.0 or 2.0 at this time," Microsoft said, repeating the same verbiage from last month's announcement. "Customers running Azure Functions targeting 1.0 or 2.0 will also continue to receive security updates and patches moving forward -- to both the Azure Functions runtime and the underlying .NET runtime -- for apps running in Azure. Whenever there's a major version deprecation, we plan to provide notice at least a year in advance for users to migrate their apps to a newer version."

About the Author

David Ramel is an editor and writer for Converge360.

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