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Microsoft Announces Playwright for Python Web Testing Tool

The Playwright tool that automates web testing for JavaScript applications is now out in preview for Python.

"Playwright is a Node.js library to automate Chromium, Firefox and WebKit with a single API," its web site says. "Playwright is built to enable cross-browser web automation that is ever-green, capable, reliable and fast."

Building upon that tool, Microsoft announced Playwright for Python, addressing the most popular programming language used by Visual Studio Code developers.

"While automation is important, end-to-end tests are prone to being slow and flaky," said Microsoft's program manager for Playwright, Arjun Attam, in a Sept. 30 blog post. "To fix this, we released Playwright in JavaScript earlier this year and have enabled thousands of developers and testers to be successful at end-to-end testing. Today, we're bringing the same capabilities to Python."

Playwright in Animated Action
[Click on image for larger, animated GIF view.] Playwright in Animated Action (source: Microsoft).

Like the original, it can also be used to author end-to-end tests for all major browsers, and Attam claimed its automation capabilities improve upon existing testing tools.

The project's GitHub site says the team is now converting the Node.js documentation to Python, but the current documentation's API is basically the same so it can be used until that conversion is complete.

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David Ramel is an editor and writer for Converge360.

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