Desmond File

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Microsoft Opens Up APIs, Protocols

Michael Desmond, founding editor of Redmond Developer News and Desmond File blogger, is on vacation. Filling in for him today is Kathleen Richards, senior editor of RDN. You can reach her at krichards@reddevnews.com.

Big interop news out of Redmond this morning. As reported by my RDN colleague Jeffrey Schwartz, Microsoft is making a push to be more open:

"In a major shift in its business model, Microsoft today said it is placing a significant emphasis on standardization and interoperability, saying it will share its APIs, release extensive documentation of its protocols, and is promising not to sue open source developers who use Microsoft's patented protocols for non-commercial implementations."

Read the rest of the story here. --Kathleen Richards

Posted on 02/21/2008 at 1:15 PM


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