Desmond File

Blog archive

VS 2010 RC: Gains Speed, Loses Silverlight 4 Support

The release candidate (RC) of Visual Studio 2010 goes to general availability today, probably around 3pm Eastern Standard Time, according to a blog post by Jason Zander. The RC code gives developers a chance to kick the tires on the next version of Microsoft's flagship integrated development environment (IDE). The RTM of Visual Studio 2010 is due to roll out on April 12.

Once the bits go live, you can download the RC here.

Key Microsoft developer execs like Zander and Soma Somasegar have blogged about the VS2010 RC. Based on what they're saying, the ongoing complaints about performance in the beta versions of Visual Studio have gotten plenty of attention. The very early returns are encouraging.

Keith Patrick, responding on Jason Zander's blog, wrote: "Wow! I was disappointed (very) in the Beta 2 performance (5 second lag between me typing and the letters appearing on screen), but the RC is blazing. Ridiculously so."

Visual Studio Magazine contributor Dan Wahlin had this to say in a tweet: "The performance improvements with VS 2010 RC compared to previous builds are huge. Really happy with what I'm seeing so far."

Some developers are disappointed, however, with the lack of Silverlight 4 support in the Visual Studio 2010 RC. VS 2010 Beta 2 currently supports Silverlight 4 development, but Scott Guthrie, blogging on the RC drop, wrote that the RC only supports Silverlight 3 projects. He urged developers working with Silverlight 4 to stick with VS 2010 Beta 2.

"Silverlight 3 projects are supported with today's VS 2010 RC build -- however Silverlight 4 projects are not yet supported," Guthrie wrote. "We will be adding VS 2010 RC support for SL4 with the next public Silverlight 4 drop. If you are doing active Silverlight 4 development today we recommend staying with the VS10 Beta 2 build for now."

Posted by Michael Desmond on 02/10/2010 at 1:15 PM


comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • Java on Visual Studio Code Going Cloud Native

    Cloud-native development figures prominently in a new roadmap published by Microsoft's Java on Visual Studio Code dev team.

  • Speed Lines Graphic

    Quantum-Inspired Annealing Using C# or Python

    Dr. James McCaffrey of Microsoft Research explains a new idea that slightly modifies standard simulated annealing by borrowing ideas from quantum mechanics.

  • Visual Studio 2022 v17.1 Preview 3 Improves Web Tools

    Microsoft quietly shipped Visual Studio 2022 v17.1 Preview 3 with enhancements to web tools.

  • Progress Telerik Adds 20-Plus Components for Blazor, .NET MAUI and WinUI

    The R1 2022 release of Progress Telerik development tooling adds more than 20 new components to the Blazor, .NET MAUI and WinUI offerings.

Upcoming Events