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Version Control for Small Teams: Team Foundation Services

In an earlier tip, I suggested that in five or 10 minutes, you could set up a source control system for yourself by using Subversion; but what if you're part of a team? Even if every team member has their own source control in place (doubtful), you still want some central repository that represents your "gold" code. There is a simple solution and it's free, provided your project has five or fewer members: Team Foundation Service (Team Foundation Server in the cloud). While the TFS team says TFS will work with any editor, TFS integrates especially well with Visual Studio 2012 and 2013. If you're using Visual Studio 2010, you can still use TFS: just follow these steps, which includes installing a quick patch.

With TFS, you not only get cloud-based source control, you also get a central location to keep track of your team's work items (tasks and features), plus virtual meeting rooms if you're not all within driving distance of each other. Of course, if you get too dependent on TFS and add a sixth member to your team, you might have to buy one of Microsoft's plans or export your code and find a new provider.

Posted by Peter Vogel on 01/27/2014 at 9:16 AM


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