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One Simple Tip to Fix the ObamaCare Web Site

According to the Time magazine article about the team that fixed the ObamaCare site, the first thing the team did was build in a cache (in fact, they were horrified to discover that the site was built without a server-side cache for frequently used data). If you're reading this Web site, you already knew about that and how easy it is to implement using either the ASP.NET Cache object on the server or local storage on the client. It could have been you on that team.

There's even better news: With .NET 4, a MemoryCache object is available in the System.Runtime.Caching library, and you can use it in non-ASP.NET applications.

Posted by Peter Vogel on 06/09/2014 at 11:21 AM


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