.NET Tips and Tricks

Blog archive

Hiding Methods from IntelliSense

Believe it or not, there are times when you have a member in your class that you don't want to appear in the class's IntelliSense lists.

In a column earlier this month I talked about how to have your class work with the .NET Framework support for formatting strings (things like "{0:G}," for example). By the time I had finished implementing this feature, my sample class had a method that no developer would ever call -- the method would only be called by .NET Framework components.

Because my method will never be called by a developer, it doesn't make a lot of sense to have that method cluttering up the class's IntelliSense list. To stop that method from appearing in the class's IntelliSense list, I could decorate the method with the EditorBrowsable attribute, passing the enumerated value EditorBrowsableState.Never. Here's the method from that column with the attribute applied to it:

<EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)>
Public Function ToString1(format As String, formatProvider As IFormatProvider) As...

The trouble is, other than suppressing this ToString method, I literally cannot think of any other case when I'd want to use this attribute (after all, if I wanted a developer to stop using the method, I'd decorate it with the Obsolete attribute).

I suppose you could use the two attributes together: one to hide the method so a developer won't know about it while keeping the method in the class so old code would run; the other attribute to generate compile time warnings about how existing code should stop using the method. But that sure seems like a lot of work to invest in something you don't want people to use.

Posted by Peter Vogel on 01/21/2016 at 10:34 AM


comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • Steve Sanderson Wows Web-Devs with Peek at 'Blazor United' for .NET 8

    "We've started some experiments to combine the advantages of Razor Pages, Blazor Server and Blazor WebAssembly all into one thing."

  • Spring Cloud Azure 5.0 Ships with Updated, Redesigned Documentation

    "We've created a new online resource, Azure for Spring developers, to help Spring developers code, deploy and scale their Spring applications on Azure.

  • What's New in Progress Telerik UI for Blazor, .NET MAUI and WinForms

    The company said its new Progress Developer Tools R1 2023 release includes design and accessibility upgrades, deeper customizations and support for the latest frameworks.

  • Take ChatGPT for a Spin with VS Code Tools

    With ChatGPT being the first "It" tech in the cutting-edge AI space that regular people can play around with, it's no wonder that tools to use it are exploding in the Visual Studio Code Marketplace.