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Write to Visual Studio's Output Window on Your Breakpoints

I can't tell you the number of times I've put a breakpoint inside a loop so that I could stop each time I go through the loop and check the value of some variable or property. Unfortunately, by the third or fourth trip through the loop I've forgotten what the values were on my first trip through the loop.

If that's your life also, your best choice is to use a tracepoint which will write the information you're interested in to the output window. With a tracepoint, you can review the values you're interested in after the loop finishes. You can even just let your code run, rather than stopping on the line you're interested in.

Setting a tracepoint varies from one version of Visual Studio to another. The easiest way is to set a breakpoint and then right click on the dot in the margin that marks your breakpoint. When the popup menu appears, either select the When Hit choice (in earlier versions of Visual Studio) or the Actions choice (in later versions). Those choices will display the dialog that lets you define your tracepoint.

In that dialog you can enter the message you want written to the output window, enclosing any variables you want displayed in curly braces ({ }). Something like "The counter is {i} and the Customer's age is {cust.age}" will work, for example.

If you'd rather not stop on the breakpoint, make sure the Continue Execution checkbox at the bottom of the dialog is checked. You can do a quick visual check to see if you'll be stopping on the line: If you still have a dot in the margin, it's still a breakpoint and you'll stop every time the line is hit; if you have a diamond in the margin, it's a tracepoint and will just write out your message without pausing.

Now run your application and, after it finishes, look in the output window to see how your data changed over time.

Posted by Peter Vogel on 06/23/2016 at 10:52 AM


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