.NET Tips and Tricks

Blog archive

Dealing with Read-Only Files

It's easy to miss that you've opened a read-only file in Visual Studio: When you open a file you can't change, a tiny little lock icon appears on the tab of the editor window to the right of the file's name. By default, Visual Studio won't even tell you that you can't change the file until -- after you've made all your changes, of course -- you try to save the file. Only then do you get the bad news with a dialog that gives you three choices:

  • You can create a new file
  • Attempt to overwrite the file (that is, attempt to make the file writeable)
  • Cancel and go back to the file which holds a ton of changes you can't save

Notice the absence of a "Oh , just throw everything away" option.

If you'd prefer to know about this problem before you start making your changes then you just need to set an option in Visual Studio. Go to Tools | Options | Environment | Documents and uncheck the option called "Allow editing of read-only files; warn when attempt to save."

Now, when you start to make changes a read only file you'll get that dialog box asking if you want to create a new file, make the file writeable, or cancel. This time, the cancel option will return you to a file that you haven't invested any time in.

By the way, and for the record, the "make writeable" option never works. It's just there to give you hope ... and then crush it.

Posted by Peter Vogel on 06/20/2018 at 10:50 AM


comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • .NET Core Ranks High Among Frameworks in New Dev Survey

    .NET Core placed high in a web-dominated ranking of development frameworks published by CodinGame, which provides a tech hiring platform.

  • Here's a One-Stop Shop for .NET 5 Improvements

    Culled from reams of Microsoft documentation, here's a high-level summary of what's new for performance, networking, diagnostics and more, along with links to the nitty-gritty details for those wanting to dig in more.

  • Azure SQL Database Ranked Among Top 3 Databases of 2020

    Microsoft touted the inclusion of Azure SQL Database among the top three databases of 2020 in a popularity ranking by DB-Engines, which collects and manages information about database management systems, updating its lists monthly.

  • Time Tracker Says VS Code Is No. 1 Editor for Devs, Some Working 15+ Hours Per Day

    WakaTime, which does time tracking for programmers, released data for 2020 showing that Visual Studio Code is by far the top editor/IDE used by its coders, some of whom are hacking away for more than 15 hours per day.

Upcoming Events