Onward and Upward

Blog archive

LightSwitch HTML Client Runtime Updated

Microsoft has updated the HTML client runtime in LightSwitch, its lightweight Web development tool. "Runtime Update 1", as it's called, is a bug and compatibility fix for the latest versions of jQuery, jQueryMobile and datajs.

The update adds support for jQueryMobile 1.3 and jQuery 1.9, according to this blog posting from the LightSwitch team. "Embracing the mobile-first, instead of mobile-only, approach was the main focus of this release," the team states.

The key upgrade to the runtime, it appears from the blog, is the implementation of responsive design. Responsive design automatically resizes an interface according to the screen size of a particular device. (It's something we did on VisualStudioMagazine.com; we've been writing about some of the challenges.)

The update is available through NuGet. The first step is to update the "Microsoft.LightSwitch.Client.JavaScript.Runtime" package, which also grabs the latest supported dependencies. The next step is to increment the version numbers of the JavaScript and CSS files in the default.htm file (the blog specifies which files). Note that you'll need to do that for every LightSwitch project you have.

For more information on exactly what LightSwitch is and what it does, check out a video Q & A I did with expert Michael Washington at our VSLive! Las Vegas show.

Posted by Keith Ward on 05/07/2013 at 1:15 PM


comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • Python in VS Code Adds Data Viewer for Debugging

    The January 2021 update to the Python Extension for Visual Studio Code is out with a short list of new features headed by a data viewer used while debugging.

  • GitHub Ships Enterprise Server 3.0 Release Candidate

    It's described as "the biggest ever change to Enterprise Server," with improvements to Actions, Packages, mobile, security and more.

  • Attacks on .NET Apps Grow in Number, Severity, Says Security Firm

    .NET apps were found to have more serious vulnerabilities and suffer more attacks last year, according to data gathered by Contrast Labs.

  • Microsoft Opens Up Old Win32 APIs to C# and Rust, More Languages to Come

    Microsoft is opening up old Win32 APIs long used for 32-bit Windows programming, letting coders use languages of their choice instead of the default C/C++ option.

Upcoming Events