.NET Tips and Tricks

Blog archive

Visual Studio Tip: The Difference Between Start Without Debugging and Start with Debugging

This isn't so much a tip as a clarification: I often find that people are confused about what happens when you press F5 vs. when you press Control_F5. Here's the best description I've found (and it's from the blog where I've found most of the Visual Studio tips that I talk about here).

However, the blog's claim that there isn't much difference between F5 and Control_F5 isn't quite true; there are a number of differences I keep stumbling upon. I suspect that, from a technical/internals point of view, the statement that there aren't many differences is true. But for a developer using Visual Studio, there are a number of "operational" differences.

For instance, if you want to test your user interface's error handling, use Control_F5. With plain old F5, Visual Studio stops on the line that throws the exception; with Control_F5, Visual Studio lets your Try…Catch blocks handle the exception.

Here's another one: If you run a Console application with plain old F5, the console window flashes on the screen and disappears, unless you add a Console.ReadLine to your code; with Control_F5, the console window is held on the screen until you hit the Return key.

I bet that's not all of the differences. What ones do you know about?

Posted by Peter Vogel on 10/22/2013 at 10:00 AM


comments powered by Disqus

Featured

  • .NET Core Ranks High Among Frameworks in New Dev Survey

    .NET Core placed high in a web-dominated ranking of development frameworks published by CodinGame, which provides a tech hiring platform.

  • Here's a One-Stop Shop for .NET 5 Improvements

    Culled from reams of Microsoft documentation, here's a high-level summary of what's new for performance, networking, diagnostics and more, along with links to the nitty-gritty details for those wanting to dig in more.

  • Azure SQL Database Ranked Among Top 3 Databases of 2020

    Microsoft touted the inclusion of Azure SQL Database among the top three databases of 2020 in a popularity ranking by DB-Engines, which collects and manages information about database management systems, updating its lists monthly.

  • Time Tracker Says VS Code Is No. 1 Editor for Devs, Some Working 15+ Hours Per Day

    WakaTime, which does time tracking for programmers, released data for 2020 showing that Visual Studio Code is by far the top editor/IDE used by its coders, some of whom are hacking away for more than 15 hours per day.

Upcoming Events